Many people will tell you applying lawn seed in the winter months is a sure-fire way to jumpstart your lawn for the spring. The idea here is that the freezing and thawing of the ground in the winter and early spring will work the seed into the ground and be ready to germinate in the spring.

This seems pretty logical and for the most part is true.

However, there are a couple of things to consider before applying that bag of grass seed on a sunny day in February.

The first is to consider the slope of your yard. If you have hills or grade changes in your lawn, any seed you put down may get moved around by rain. The steeper the slope, the greater the risk of the seed being physically relocated.

Another thing to keep in mind is your plan to apply a spring crabgrass preventer. Crabgrass preventers (often termed ‘pre-emergents’) are typically the first lawn application you make in the spring. The way they prevent crabgrass is by stopping the growth of just-sprouting seeds. Unfortunately, most crabgrass preventers stop the growth of just-sprouting LAWN seeds just as they do WEED seeds. Any area that you winter-seeded must be avoided with a crabgrass preventer in the spring.

Keep these ideas in mind before spending time and resources applying lawn seed in the winter. A little thinking ahead will save you time in the long run. If you are ready to start planning your lawn care strategy for 2019, please stop in! We will listen to your specific needs and suggest the appropriate steps for your best lawn this year.